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History
El Juego de Mani ('game of war') often simply called maní or mani, sometimes referred to as baile de maní ('dance of war') or bambosa, is a combined martial art and dance that was developed in Cuba by African slaves. It has its roots in the Kongo-Angola culture and is still kept alive today in Cuba by folkloric groups. Practitioners are referred to as maniseros. Cuban juego de maní is related to Brazilian capoeira in its African roots, as both derive from the Kongo-Angola culture.[citation needed] As with other similar dance and martial artforms arising in the 16th century onward among African slaves in European colonies in the Americas, juego de maní developed initially as means for the slaves to disguise fighting practice as a form of dance, in their scarce free time from labor.
(source citation en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juego_de_maní )

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Style
Bouts feature a pair of opponents who follow prescribed dancing and fighting patterns, in a circle. In early colonial Cuba, maní involved a solo dancer who danced within a circle of opponents, who tried to strike blows as he executed various jumps and evasive steps. It later became a one-on-one form.
Although not as gymnastic as capoeira regional, it is much more similar to capoeira Angola, and to l'agya (a.k.a. damaye or mayolé) from Martinique and Guadeloupe. The footwork is similar in theory to the Brazilian ginga, but has a more stomping motion.

(source citation en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juego_de_maní

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Videography










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